10.06.2019

When Two Great Creatives Get Together

Hey ! !

Over the past few years or so I have been lucky to have met and worked with two great new friends.  Meet Jacob Wolfe and Tuan Le.  They were all involved and still are in that place I call "little cabin in the woods." Tuan and his other 1/2 Lauren and I all co-own and share and Jacob helped create the amazing entrance (as well as several cool client projects) to our little dream house.  So happy QC noticed their amazing talent too!  Thought I'd share and at the same time thank them for continuing to create amazing things.. stay tuned.. a collaboration is coming up on a project of mine!


Jacob Benjamin Wolfe Inspires A Higher Pursuit




Jacob Benjamin Wolfe began as a violinist. That’s right: he first studied music, not woodworking. The intricate detail etched into the timber he molds and shapes betrays the kind of education that the masters who inspired him received. The more-beautiful-than-life representations of the human form and biblical scenes from masters like Bernini and Michelangelo were the result of a lifetime of study and work, but in just seven years, Wolfe has made strides, leaps, and bounds, in pursuit of that same passion.

Wolfe does his work in a factory space in North Davidson, right down the street from NoDa Brewery and next door to Amelie’s business office. Upon entering his shop, one is met by large pallets of wood ready to be cut and nine-foot-tall statues of figures like John the Baptist and Jesus Christ. Standing in front of the barn door he made, you can see a gorgeously colorful mural (three stories tall and the length of a city block) in the distance.

Most of Wolfe’s work is done for the church. The first woodworking job he ever undertook was to renovate St. John the Baptist Church, transforming what was a drab, white-walled room into the exquisitely carved sanctuary it is today. That was eight years ago. Looking back on it, he sees that first project as an essential stepping stone. He’s currently working on St. Thomas Aquinas’ church, asked to do so by the same priest who originally requested his help at John the Baptist. In a way, he’s come full circle.

“The purpose of church art and architecture,” says Wolfe, “other than its functionality, is to draw the viewer up toward heaven, and to try our best to represent the beauty of heaven so the viewer can be inspired to live a life that leads there.”


“The purpose of church art and architecture,” says Wolfe, “other than its functionality, is to draw the viewer up toward heaven, and to try our best to represent the beauty of heaven so the viewer can be inspired to live a life that leads there.”

The yearning for a closer relationship with God has driven Wolfe to where he is. It seems poetic in a way, like a veritable Joseph the Carpenter, blessed with the knowledge of styles that defined the rebirth of art. Wolfe is self-taught, but he’s had the good fortune to be mentored by world-class artists, who still come by to give him advice now and then. To attain the skill of the masters of old seems like a lofty goal for anyone, but Wolfe is well on his way.

Wood And Metalworking At Hoang Le’s 2dash1




2dash1 is Charlotte’s most unique woodshop/metalworking shop; it’s a building company with a story, and one that has already made a name for itself in the local community. Owner and founder Hoang Le reflected on how he came up with the name for his company: His friend’s young daughter, Amara, had a hard time pronouncing Hoang’s name. She kept saying “two-one,” and the nickname just stuck. Today, with a thriving business that’s an extension of himself, it seemed fitting the nickname carry on.




2dash1 is your local one-stop-shop for all metal and wood designing needs, and Hoang Le has made a reputation out of going above and beyond client desires and expectations.

Even if you don’t recognize Hoang’s business name, you have certainly noted his work, on display in beloved venues like GoodRoad Ciderworks, LeRoy Fox Restaurant, Anthropologie, and QC Social Lounge. The designer had tried numerous industries before he found his niche in the building environment, one where he says he is allowed to fully learn from and love his work. 2dash1 is your local one-stop-shop for all metal and wood designing needs, and Hoang Le has made a reputation out of going above and beyond client desires and expectations. He was noticed quickly by industry professionals of all sorts, from builders to interior designers and his passion for the craft is just as strong whether the project requires flooring, stairs, or custom-made pieces. Tuan sat down with us to talk all things 2dash1 and what it’s like to own the business.


Do you prefer commercial or residential projects?

We like doing both, honestly. Both types of projects bring their own set of challenges and rewards. For residential projects, it’s nice knowing a family or individual will enjoy the space and design for their relaxation and everyday life; On the flip side, there is a thrill knowing the masses will enjoy and see it when it comes to commercial projects. Both types of projects bring me a lot of joy.

In your opinion, what does it take to be a good craftsman?

Passion, dedication, and patience. You have to love what you do in order to dedicate your life to mastering your skills. Additionally, you must be patient with the process; there will be failures and that is okay as long as you keep trying.
What types of services do you offer to customers?
We offer a range of services per what our customers need. We are able to design and build, or just do one or the other. We have the capabilities to create what the customer is envisioning whether that is furniture, art, or a staircase.



What is your favorite part of the design process?
I love hand-sketching ideas before transferring them to a CAD and 3D rendering. Once it’s 3D, we show the customer how their idea is brought to life in their new or already-in-use space. But that raw moment of putting my thoughts to print is what I love.

How do you blend creativity with practicality and functionality?
I really listen to our clients to see what the use for the project is and their personal practicality of it. We always want to deliver a product that looks amazing, functions well, and ages beautifully.

How much creative liberty do you have with your work?
This all depends on the client. I treat each client differently. Some clients allow me to extend my creativity because they trust my design and me knowing how to incorporate that into their style. Others come in knowing what they want and are wanting their vision brought to life. We’re happy to do that, too. 









1 comment:

  1. Very informative article. I think there should be an article regarding management softwares like,
    Design and Build in Islamabad

    ReplyDelete